Witness to Rep. Pantelakos: F—K you!

Things got ugly in Concord Tuesday after a hearing on a bill to place TSA officials who engage in random pat-downs and body scans on the state’s sexual predator registry.

WMUR reported on a visibly upset Concord resident who recounted to the Criminal Justice Committee how he recently had to cancel a visit with his mother because he did not want to submit to pat downs. The man made a point of overemphasizing the word “submit.”

After the hearing, Rep. Laura Pantelakos (D-Portsmouth) told the man that he does not need to get on an airplane if he doesn’t want to. “That is your choice,” she said.

“F—K you!” the man barked back, though the comment was bleeped out by WMUR.

Author: Patrick Hynes

Share This Post On
468 ad
  • Cwolfe

    Unfortunately the witness turned the discussion away from the issues and to himself. Rep. Pantelakos obviously see’s Air travel as a luxury and the government’s right to unwarranted search and seizure of a persons body.

    As Rahm Emanuel said so clearly, “don’t let a good crisis go to waste” the democrats are using “public safety” as a means to desensitize the people to search on demand.

    The witness is right, it is an invasion of a person’s body and should not be permitted.

    There are more effective forms of threat detection.

    • Commentariette

      Isn’t the whole point of having a witness (rather than a legal expert) to describe the impact of legislation on actual people?

      The TSAs intimate physical searches of air travelers are causing enormous damage to families that have been split apart because people (whether survivors of sexual assault or not) cannot endure strangers putting their hands on their breasts, probing into their genitals and reaching into their pants.

      Ms Pantelakos was apparently born in 1935 and her previous occupation is listed as “waitress” — perhaps she thinks that taking butt pinching and titty grabbing with a smile is just a normal part of being a woman (info via congress.org).

      Yeah – f*** her.

    • http://chuquito.livejournal.com/ CK

      Your comment is 100% correct.

      Are you the same CWolfe as the brilliant Marquette U. professor? If so, kudos to you, sir. I enjoy your work thoroughly.

    • R Ross

      This whole issue is supposed to be security. Yet every threat that has been discovered recently has been by people ENTERING the U.S. from Europe, not people from within the U.S. Our superior, intellectual government doesn’t seem to see that. I don’t get to fly very often but I think I would demand any person that began to grope me be arrested for sexual assault.

  • Narby

    I had a security clearance in the air force, working around nuclear weapons literally every day. I should be searching the TSA people, not the other way round. I resent the intrusive searches.

    The airlines have the lobbyists in DC, and when enough people stop flying as I have they will fix the problem.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jorge-Emilio-Emrys-Landivar/37403083 Jorge Emilio Emrys Landivar

    Because “travel at home and abroad” is a privaledge not a right… oh wait…
    U.S. v Guest
    Shapiro v Thompson
    Saenz v Roe
    all say that the right to travel is fundamental…

  • Geekwitha45

    Attention NH Journal: Be advised that the graphic of the girl was revealed to be a fake.

    • Comatus

      “But accurate.” Heh.

  • Geekwitha45

    The matter of the TSA Security Theater is a lot simpler than people think.

    Once you clear away the smoke, obfuscation, and incrementalism, is is clearly a power grab.

    First, the scanners are a form of strip search. The question of strip search does not turn on the removal of clothes, it turns on the forced revelation of that which is normally ours to with hold. The fact that technology makes it feasible to do this on a massive scale does not change the matter. Our law and society has already processed the issue of the circumstances under which strip search is permissible, and boarding an aircraft is not one of them.

    Next, the issue of the pat down for opt outs. This is a direct frisk search. Again, our law and society has processed that matter, and defined the circumstances under which it is permissible, and again, boarding an aircraft is not one of them.

    In fact, if you reference the *original* arguments and court decisions that approved of metal detectors, they are in part dependent on the premise that magnetometer scans are not really “searches”, which is a premise that cannot be supported in the face of frisk or scan.

    • Anonymous

      Your logic seems very sound. So how can we stop this absurd practice by the government? Think the ACLU will take a case of sexual harassment? Know anyone that needs to get somewhere flying that will risk not being able to get on a plane and challenge this practice?

      The big lie about this issue is the fact that all incidents causing this practice were of people coming into the U.S. from Europe. Absolutely know incident has occurred or been discovered and stopped of a person within the U.S being a threat.

      So your assertion that of this being a power grab is point on. Thanks for your analysis. Hope you send this to your political representatives and demand that the practice to stopped.

  • Anonymous

    Only 2-3 years ago the libDems screamed how the Patriot Act destroyed their constitutional rights to privacy by allowing the FBI to monitor the books that they check out of the library. Now this very same group supports and promotes feel-ups and scr0tum checks.

    • USAHawk

      Agreed, macdaddy, but in the same vein, I think its ridiculous and hypocritical of conservatives who supported the Patriot Act to now turn around and whine about body scanners. I’ve got nothing to hide, so if these scanners could help security personnel catch those who want to harm America then they’re fine by me.

      As for the pat downs, no one has to “submit” to a pat down unless they refuse the scanner, so its kind of a no-brainer. As a frequent traveler, I’ve been through the scanners multiple times and it’s no big deal. This whole controversy is just another example of the wussification of America.

      If an individual TSA agent truly does abuse their authority in an unnecessarily invasive way, then they should be subject to disciplinary/legal proceedings, but let’s let these people do their jobs and not allow the fear of frivolous lawsuits interfere with catching potential terrorists.

      • Anonymous

        Glad you think illegal searches are OK. But did you realize that
        every threat that has been discovered recently has been by people ENTERING the U.S. from Europe, not people from within the U.S. Absolutely no incident has occurred or been discovered and stopped of a person within the U.S being a threat.

      • Anonymous

        Naaaah, I don’t buy it. How many man-hours and expenses did the FBI generate on library book checks versus the number of man-hours and expenses generated by the TSA on invasive pat-downs body scans? Do you really think that they are equivalent? As far as I know, neither activity has yet to produce one captured terrorist. But one is exponentially more expensive than the other. Besides, the TSA needs to be doing it right–not until they start profiling for behavior will I buy this very bad act. As long as they don’t do this, this half-A$sed and phony “feel-good” effort won’t fly with me.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_53YAPDXSTIGEDINDXF46CAB7ZY voted against carter

          THE WHOLE TSA INTRUSIVE PAT DOWN IS DESIGNED TO CONDITION US TO ACCEPT GOVERNMENT CONTROL. It has NOTHING to do with security. that is just a pretext for justification.

          PERIOD.

      • Sarah

        The telephone exchange outrage was really trumped up, and not, in any case, on a par with routine strip-searching frisking of the physical person of nearly every ordinar person traveling within the United states. They can be distinguished.

        Also, you are wrong that anyone can go through the scanner to avoid a grope. Leaving aside the issue radiation dangers, which have been understated by TSA (or at least, claims of safety overstated) which make using the scanners objectionable on an entirely different level than “wussiness” about modesty –

        Persons who are handicapped, disabled, etc, are groped, they can’t go through the scanner. Persons who can’t go through the scanner are groped. Persons who DO go through the scanner are often pulled aside and groped as well – for no reason or because their maxi pad is too opaque, etc.

        The searches go beyond the scope of a permissable administrative search because the degree of invasiveness is not justified by the safety gained. The gropes and scanners do not and cannot reveal reliably, the weapons and explosives that prompted their adoption. They dilute security resources and make us all less safe. The invasion of privacy for persons suspected of absolutely nothing, and have no indicators of unusual risk, is too extreme. The value gained does not justify the invasion, and burdens free travel and movement excessively.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_53YAPDXSTIGEDINDXF46CAB7ZY voted against carter

        THE WHOLE TSA INTRUSIVE PAT DOWN IS DESIGNED TO CONDITION US TO ACCEPT GOVERNMENT CONTROL. It has NOTHING to do with security. that is just a pretext for justification.

        PERIOD.

      • Anonymous

        wussification – oh boy do u have it ! wussied thinking. You should change your handle to Linus (peanuts character – for the young’ns on here). TSA is nothing but a paint job, water color at that, completely worthless. An illiterate 10yr old with one eye and six thumbs could get over on them and do some real damage.
        Just in case your slow – “TSA is providing you with a false sense of security”- like Linus’s blanket ! At a discounted rate of what – 100 billion or so / yr !

      • 3BlindMice

        Um… at Thanksgiving I went through a metal detector. The metal detector didn’t go off. I was forced to submit to a “random patdown” because I’m blonde and have big boobs (something I can’t help.. I do not dye my hair). I did not have a choice about it, and I did not refuse the scanner, either. The scanners were not turned on.

        • Anonymous

          Scanners not turned on, but I am. Glad to hear the carpet matches the drapes.

          Assuming you find this intrusion by government hands objectionable, I hope you contact some legislators to push this bill to pass. If people can’t recognize this for what it is, the frogs will never save themselves from becoming boiled frog legs.
          – C. dog, always the dog ;-)

      • porchhound

        Apples and oranges here and you know it. Equating the unequivocal is the left’s best effort at replacing honest debate with obfuscation

  • Anonymous

    This whole issue is supposed to be security. Yet every threat that has been discovered recently has been by people ENTERING the U.S. from Europe, not people from within the U.S. Our superior, intellectual government doesn’t seem to see that. I don’t get to fly very often but I think I would demand any person that began to grope me be arrested for sexual assault.

  • Anonymous

    I like Pantelakos’ attempt to kick the can up rank just so she doesn’t have to do her job. Guess the party of Truman is just full of lemmings nowadays.

    A few points there, if he doesn’t have to fly can he also opt out of all state fees and taxes that support the airport? If flying is his choice logically supporting it must also be an available choice.

    Secondly, if a federal agent commits a sexual crime, or a murder, in New Hampshire…even on the job…they are under the jurisdiction of local laws and police. Claiming that it’s “must be resolved at the federal level” therefore is a blatant lie. A bill that would recognize what, in every other context, is a physical or sexual assault therefore is a rational and good decision by the state legislature.

    Finally, Ms. Pantelakos, something I can tell you’ve never seen before:

    “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    Congress has no power to institute the kinds of searches the TSA now employs. And if Congress lacks that power there is no way for the Executive branch to assume it either as their powers only come from what Congress grants them.

    So Ms. Pantelakos, please explain to your voters how you are openly in support of sexual assaults perpetrated by an unconstitutional mandate?

    • Anonymous

      Wonder if she took the constitutional oath? Or did she raise her left hand?
      – C. dog

  • southdakotaboy

    The older lady was right about the fact that Federal Law trumps State law. However there is nothing preventing New Hampshire from passing a law that says that passangers have every right to conduct a strip search of TSA employees. Lets see how they like it.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_53YAPDXSTIGEDINDXF46CAB7ZY voted against carter

    ALL TSA employees ARE PERVERTS.

    “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    Congress has no power to institute the kinds of searches the TSA now employs. And if Congress lacks that power there is no way for the Executive branch to assume it either as their powers only come from what Congress grants them.

    I COULD NOT AGREE MORE!!!

    THE WHOLE TSA INTRUSIVE PAT DOWN IS DESIGNED TO CONDITION US TO ACCEPT GOVERNMENT CONTROL. It has NOTHING to do with security. This is just a pretext for justification.

    PERIOD.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CAWL7CY642B22U53WITUHLQZDI Judy

    How mature of this so called man. I would rather be scanned than continue to be a witch about it and possibly be the cause of more Americans and others dying from terrorist. I agree with the Rep., no one is making anyone fly.

    • Kim Sung Ill, the turd

      The government of North Korea could really use a lady like you, Judy? Are you currently working? How would you feel about 3 bowls of Kimchi/day on the house? Call 800-COMMIES and mash 2 for English, then 5 for our HR department

    • Dakotahgeo

      There’s always one or two skull rats who are scared of their shadow! I’m more worried by people like you!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_D7ZXLQWAIWYID3S5BJYQEETHTQ DavidT

    Nappy could do us all a favor by resigning, “if she only had a brain”!

  • porchhound

    Good for him..sorry he couldn’t work in BIATCH too.

  • 3BlindMice

    Rep. Pantelakos, you do realize that TSA VIPR teams are also in bus stations, train stations, and along interstate highways, as well. I guess taking a train, bus, or driving in a choice too. The next time I go home to Iowa from Georgia, I am walking! (Of course, walking is transportation too… so I guess I will be sexually molested on the sidewalk next).

  • Anonymous

    These people were searched by TSA AFTER arriving in Savannah by TRAIN:

    http://gizmodo.com/#!5768805/tsa-harasses-9+yo-boy-and-other-train-passengers-after-their-trip

    Maybe you can let Rep. Laura Pantelakos (D-Portsmouth) know what’s going on!

  • Anonymous

    Good for him! She obviously has no regard for her privacy or that of her constituents. Apparently she finds being publicly groped by a stranger perfectly acceptable. What a disgrace.

    The bigger problem though is TSA. There have been six reports of TSA failure and abuse in the past week alone!

    • The Rep Cissna incident in Seattle where she refused to expose a breast prosthetic.
    • The frisking of a 9 year-old and his family in Savannah after they got off of a train
    • The TSA failure to find a handgun five times at a DFW checkpoint/
    • The Buffalo TSO was arrested for drug trafficking,
    • Three box cutters that made it aboard an aircraft at JFK this weekend.
    • The 27 screeners under investigation in HNL (3% of staff) for failure to screen bags.

    In the past four months one teen has died, there have been four arrests or convictions for TSO theft from passengers, thousands of groping and theft complaints and five incidents of weapons getting through security. What will TSA accomplish in twelve months?

    When will Congress act to get this agency under control? The TSA situation has become so bad that States such as NH, NJ, and CA are resorting to local legislation to protect their citizens from this agency. It is distressing that State and local governments must resort to their own measures to protect passengers from abuses by the Federal government that is charged with protecting citizen civil and human rights.

    It is imperative that TSA becomes focused on effective security and cease these absurd and unduly intrusive theatrics. These misguided policies and waste of resources are providing an open invitation for another 9/11 style tragedy. These reports are a dire warning that TSA is making us more vulnerable and are responsible for more crimes than they have prevented.

  • Anonymous

    This is the response one gets from someone who feels totally frustrated. When enough people begin to feel this way one gets a revolution.I can hardly contain myself.

  • Anonymous

    F you, indeed. Maybe dumbocrat Rep. Laura Pantelakos enjoys a good pat down. Did anyone ask her? Inquiring minds want to know.

    All insinuations and aspersions cast aside, nice move with this bill. If passed, things will become quite interesting vis-a-vis NH sovereignty. Keep pushing us forward to freedom, guys and gals. The pool’s getting warmer for the first time in a long time.
    – C. dog dons his speedo and cool-rays